Yellow Flag Press

William Kelley Woolfitt - Chorus Frog

10 USD
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William Kelley Woolfitt - Chorus Frog

10 USD
YFP-118
William Kelley Woolfitt - Chorus Frog

Chapbook (2014), 8.5 inches x 5.5 inches.

Second Printing
Limited to an edition of 50 numbered copies. 60lb. Card-stock covers with 20% cotton antique-laid paper. Hand-sewn  hemp cord binding.
Cover art by Suzanne Stryk. ($10).


In this deeply lush collection of poems, William Kelley Woolfitt explores the natural world with a keen and observing eye for detail.

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It’s a fine thing to keep company with William Kelley Woolfitt in these poems that travel widely but also turn inward, toward what home is.  I prize his observations of the living world, sharp with abundance and loss, and his gentle way of entering human dilemma, which allows him to illuminate so much about it.  Perhaps best of all, as the title promises, these poems sing.  I find Woolfitt’s pared, musical line sheer pleasure. “Dog days, shut sky, zero rain.”  “Drifts of kittiwakes still blizzard the islet...”  Beautiful.

–Lisa Coffman, author of Likely and Less Obvious Gods

 

Not only big eared bats “open their mouths in ardor” in Chorus Frog. Every poem is lyric enough to make a reader gasp at its rich language. Whether praising the elegance of a swimming shrew’s pearly slippers or imagining with empathy a woman who has left behind, to history, her hairpins, Woolfitt’s writing is equally sensuous and spiritual. Chorus Frog both gets down to the bones of timeless stories and fleshes out the small lives (of animals, of unnamed ancestors) otherwise overlooked. Generosity of perception such as Woolfitt’s saves what is beautiful in the world, not as hard fossils, but as lively poems.

-- Rose McLarney, author of The Always Broken Plates of Mountains

 

As William Woolfitt’s poems dig into the nonhuman for meaning like the three-toothed land snail after water, they find there music made of bones. Groundwater devours rock with its dripping metronome, sheet-web spiders spin swathes of blessing, and shrews walk on creeks and become apostles beaded with air bubbles. Ranging in its short compass from internment camps to elk hunts and from islands to the Appalachian Trail, Chorus Frog is alive with Woolfitt's sense of the marvelous and the sacred.

-- Catherine Carter, author of The Memory of Gills

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